The International Association for Philosophy and Literature

 

 

GRADUATE PROGRAMS SPECIALIZING IN THE CROSS-SECTIONS BETWEEN PHILOSOPHY, CULTURAL AND LITERARY THEORY, CULTURAL STUDIES, AESTHETIC THEORY, AND THE ARTS
Designed to assist students seeking information about graduate programs for advanced study.


United States and Canada

City University of New York
-Ph.D. in French

Program Description:

The Ph.D. Program in French at The Graduate Center of the City University of New York offers an innovative combination of traditional training in French and Francophone Literatures with highly progressive interdisciplinary curricular options. While specializing in one of the traditional literary periods, our graduate students are offered the possibility of enriching their professional and academic dossier with the option that would best suit their particular interests.

These options, namely Translation Studies, Comparative Studies, Cultural Studies, International Human Rights in the French-Speaking World, and Performance Studies, draw from a wide array of disciplines with courses readily available either within our own program or in the many other prestigious programs of The Graduate Center. In addition, students are strongly encouraged to opt for a multidisciplinary Certificate, which they can fulfill at the Graduate Center. These include: American Studies, Film Studies, Interactive Technology and Pedagogy, Medieval Studies, Renaissance Studies, Women’s Studies. Combined with the students’ literary interests and interdisciplinary options, these certificates are valuable assets to ensure success with their future job search in an ever-increasingly competitive market.

Executive Officer: Peter Consenstein

Contact Information:

W: http://web.gc.cuny.edu/French/program/index.html
E: Ckulikowski@gc.cuny.edu (Carole Kulikowski, Assistant Program Officer)
P: (212) 817-8365
F: (212) 817-1520


Columbia University
-Department of English and Comparative Literature

Department Administrator: Pamela Rodman

Contact information:

W: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/english/
E: pbr2101@columbia.edu (Pamela Rodman)
P: (212) 854-6416
F: (212) 854-6465
M: 602 Philosophy Hall 1150, Amsterdam Avenue, New York, NY 10027

-Institute for Comparative Literature and Society

Program Description:

The Institute for Comparative Literature and Society was founded at Columbia in 1998 to promote a global perspective in the study of literature, culture, and their social context. The Center became an Institute in July 2007. It houses the interdepartmental undergraduate and graduate programs in Comparative Literature and Society. It draws its faculty from the humanities, the social sciences, and the Schools of Architecture and Law.

One of the Institute's primary goals is to provide institutional support for cross-disciplinary and cross-regional comparative work, acknowledging the force of recent changes in the humanities, the social sciences, law, and architecture. The work of the Institute is fully historical in its range. Of particular interest to the Institute is the post-Cold War rethinking of area studies paradigms in relationship to new developments in the discipline of comparative literature itself. Our curricular planning relies heavily on cross-disciplinary team-teaching. In the curriculum, as well as in our conferences, lecture series and workshops, we bring a literature-focused study of language and culture to the area studies as they rethink their mandate; and, conversely, we try to give substance and recognition to those directions in comparative literature that can benefit from the breadth of knowledge produced by a reshaped area studies. In this effort, we work collaboratively with the social sciences. The name of our endeavor -- Institute for Comparative Literature and Society -- acknowledges that goal.

Director: Stathis Gourgouris

Contact Information:

W: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/icls
E: icls@columbia.edu
P: (212) 854-4541
F: (212) 854-3099
M: HB1-1 Heyman Center, 2960 Broadway, New York, NY 10027

Cornell University
-Department of Comparative Literature, Doctoral Program

Program Description:

The Department of Comparative Literature provides a broad range of courses in European as well as non-European literatures. Courses variously stress significant authors, themes, problems, styles, genres, historical periods, and theoretical perspectives. In cooperation with related departments in the humanities, the departmental offerings reflect current interdisciplinary approaches to literary study: hermeneutics, semiotics, deconstruction, cultural criticism, Marxism, reception aesthetics, feminism, psychoanalysis. The Department of Comparative Literature benefits from close ties with Cornell's Society for the Humanities, a center of teaching, research, and lectures that provides a unique, historic catalyst for critical and theoretical reflection on campus. The department has also vital connections to The School of Criticism & Theory, a six-week summer program of study with leading figures in critical thought, now based at Cornell.

Administrative Director: Marianne Marsh

Department Coordinator and Administrative Assistant: Susan M. Besemer

Contact information:

W: http://www.arts.cornell.edu/complit/
E: complit-mailbox@cornell.edu
P: (607) 255-4155
F: (607) 255-6661 att: ComL
M: 247 Goldwin Smith, Ithaca, NY 14853-3201


DePaul University
-Department of Philosophy, M.A. and Ph.D. Programs

Description:

DePaul University's Graduate Programs in Philosophy offer students the opportunity to study the history of philosophy from a broad. though not exclusively, European perspective and to work with some of the leading scholars in contemporary Continental thought, German Idealism, social and political theory, and ethics. Highly innovative M.A. and Ph.D. programs are designed for students who are interested in reading the history of philosophy extending from early Greek thought, through Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz and Kant, to more contemporary thinkers such as Hegel, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Foucault, Irigary and Derrida. While focusing on 19th and 20th century Continental Philosophy and the historical sources of these movements, students are provided with the necessary background to become conversant with other philosophical traditions and styles.

Program Chair: Professor Michael Naas

Associate Chair: Peg Birmingham

Contact information:

W: http://las.depaul.edu/philosophy/
E: mnaas@wppost.depaul.edu (Michael Naas)
P: 773-325-7265
F: 773-325-7268
M: 2352 N. Clifton Avenue, Suite 150 Chicago, Illinois 60614 USA

information provided by: Peg Birmingham, Associate Chair


Duke University
-Graduate Program in Literature, Ph.D.

Description:

The historical roots of the Literature Program at Duke University are in Comparative Literature. Before the Literature Program was founded, Duke had a small major in Comparative Literature. The great programs in comparative literature were founded after World War II, as an attempt to escape purely national boundaries for the study of literature. The two epochal works of the late 1940s, Wellek and Warren’s Literary Theory and Auerbach’s Mimesis, defined the field as Western, literary and literary-historical, but also as theoretical and international.

Since 1985, under the leadership of Fredric Jameson, the Literature Program at Duke University has renewed the tradition of comparative literature. Literary history has given way to broadly historicizing and interdisciplinary approaches to cultural phenomena, with an emphasis on the period from the late eighteenth century to the present. Literature has now become one of many different cultural phenomena that students and faculty work on, alongside film and video, and alongside cultural studies broadly conceived. The traditional commitment to purely literary theories has been richly supplemented by a broad range of theoretical and philosophical projects concerning art and culture, and the traditional commitment to the comparison of different national literatures has given way to global and transnational perspectives.

The Literature Program seeks to rethink what comparison might mean in a world rapidly being altered by complex forces of economic and technological integration. Although a focus on language, literature, and aesthetics continues to ground our work, we have pioneered by drawing together philosophical and theoretical reflections on the status of "literature" and "culture" with work in history, political economy, the sociology of culture, anthropology, visual culture, and cinema studies, all of which seeks to make sense of the complex factors affecting the historically changing nature of the relationship between society and culture. Literature has, in short, employed philosophical critique to interrogate and mediate our relationship to the social sciences thereby modeling a new kind of program in global studies from the perspective of the humanities, a program that recognizes that literature and culture are always crucially important agents in the understanding, definition and alteration of social formations.

Chair: Michael P Hardt

Contact:

W: http://www.duke.edu/literature/
E: katherine.hayles@duke.edu (Katherine Hayles, Director of Graduate Studies)
P: 919-684-4127
F: 919-684-3598
M: 101 Friedl Building, Box 90670, Durham, NC 27708, (919) 684-4127

 

George Mason University
-Department of Philosophy, M.A. (Philosophy and Cultural Theory Concentration

Description:

The George Mason Department of Philosophy has excellent full-time faculty committed to undergraduate and graduate education. The faculty reflects a wide range of philosophical interests. They work in both the analytic and Continental traditions, as well as in ethics and the history of philosophy.

Chair: Ted Kinnaman

Contact:

W: http://philosophy.gmu.edu
E:
amcdonal@gmu.edu (Andy McDonald)>
P: 703.993.1290
F: 703.993.1297
M: Robinson Hall B, Room 465, 4400 University Drive, 3F1, Fairfax, VA 22030-4422

-Department of Cultural Studies, Ph.D. Program

Description:

The first stand-alone interdisciplinary Ph.D. in cultural studies in the United States, the program at George Mason draws on the expertise of faculty in ten disciplines, centers, and programs. Special strengths of the program include gender/sexuality, film and media, and cultural and political economy. Available concentrations run the gamut of cultural topics: African-American studies, early modern literatures, Latin American modernities, contemporary museum studies, and popular culture.

Program Director: Roger Lancaster

Contact:

W: http://culturalstudies.gmu.edu/
E: cultural@gmu.edu
P: (703) 993-2851
F: (703) 993-2852
M: MSN 5E4, Fairfax, VA 22030-4444


George Washington University
-Human Sciences, Graduate Program

Description:

Although the study of human beings and human communities over the past few centuries has been effectively divided into disciplines and disciplinary clusters (the humanities, the social sciences, the natural sciences), the Human Sciences approaches this study through perspectives that bring together the multiple insights, methodologies, and disciplines that have been developed to account for human complexity. Understanding that the division of human knowledge into discrete categories is cultural and historical, the Human Sciences considers both what is gained from those disciplinary divisions and what new forms of knowledge might be produced in and through conversations across them.

The Human Sciences primarily locates the common ground between the humanities and social sciences using interpretive and critical modes of inquiry rather than quantitative ones. Our central commitment to critical modes of inquiry emerges from the belief that some of the most interesting work in both the humanities and social sciences over the past several decades has been work that considers how ways of speaking and writing inform and shape ways of knowing. Since quantitative methodologies themselves are among the languages we use to make sense of the world, however, quantitative approaches are also valued and studied in the Human Sciences Program.

Program Director: Professor Gail Weiss

Contact information:

W: www.gwu.edu/~humsci
E: hmsc@gwu.edu
P: 202-994-6134
F: 202-994-7034
M: 2035 F Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052

information provided by: Gail Weiss


Hebrew College
-M.A. in Jewish Liberal Studies

Descirption:

Founded in 1921, Hebrew College is dedicated to the principle that rigorous, pluralistic Jewish education is essential to building and sustaining a vibrant Jewish community. We are committed to training Jewish professionals who have a strong foundation in classical Jewish studies and are equally well equipped to engage the complexities of contemporary Jewish life.

We also embrace a mission that connects serious academic study of Judaism with the educational needs and challenges of the community, via outstanding adult learning and youth education programs. No ivory tower, Hebrew College strives to be a modern equivalent of Abraham’s tent, with all sides open to anyone who wishes to join our passionate pursuit of Jewish education.

Director of Enrollment Management: Kristen Card

Contact:

W: http://www.hebrewcollege.edu/jewish-studies
E: admissions@hebrewcollege.edu
P: 617-559-8610
F: 617-559-8601
M: 160 Herrick Road, Newton Centre, MA 02459


Johns Hopkins University
-Department of German, M.A. and Ph.D.

Description:

The German program at the Johns Hopkins University is among the most distinguished in North America. It has been a leading force in literary criticism and is internationally recognized for its strength in German and Yiddish literature from the Enlightenment to the present as well as interdisciplinary approaches to the humanities. Since the 1980s the faculty members have spearheaded efforts to study the interface of literature with philosophy, psychoanalysis, religion, and science. The interdisciplinary orientation of the faculty has put the program at the forefront of the field in North America and abroad. Scarcely a debate in literary theory has occurred in the last twenty-five years that has not involved one or more members of the German faculty.

The German program is committed to the study of the hermeneutic tradition and its critique. It is also home to the Yiddish Language, Literature, and Culture offerings at Johns Hopkins. In addition to its own distinguished faculty, the program hosts regular visitors from European universities who offer seminars at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. The section has active graduate exchange programs with the Humboldt Universität Berlin, Universität Konstanz, and Universität Hamburg. In collaboration with international partners, the program has recently hosted conferences on "Rethinking Form" and "Hannah Arendt and the Exile of Writing."

Recent graduates of the PhD program in German have received appointments at Columbia, Harvard, New York University, Yale, University of California at Santa Barbara, University of North Carolina, University of Notre Dame, and Wesleyan University.

Department Chair (German and Romance Languages): William Egginton

Section Chair (German): Rochelle Tobias

Contact:

W: http://grll.jhu.edu/german/
E: grll@jhu.edu
P: (410) 516-7227
F: (410) 516-5358
M: Department of German & Romance Languages, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218


Kansas State University
-Department of English; M.A. program in Cultural Studies

Description:

The Cultural Studies Program is a track of the MA degree in literature. Students in this program are introduced to major theoretical influences in a seminar on "The Theory and Practice of Cultural Studies," delve into a specific topic in the "Seminar in Cultural Studies," and choose from other advanced courses in literature, criticism, and theory. They also select relevant courses in other disciplines such as women's studies, anthropology, geography, history, sociology, philosophy, modern languages, political science, and mass communications. At the culmination of their degree, they develop an independent research project.

Program Director: Michele Janette

Contact:

W: http://www.k-state.edu/english/programs/culturalstudies.html
E: gradeng@ksu.edu
P: (785) 532-0772
F: (785) 532-2192
M: 108 E/CS Building, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506-6501


Marquette University
-Department of Philosophy, M.A. and Ph.D.

Description:

The Philosophy Department has 27 regular full-time faculty, with a wide range of teaching and research interests. The department has a long tradition of research strengths in Medieval Philosophy and Continental Philosophy. During the past fifteen years, the department has greatly expanded teaching and research strength in ethics, social, and applied philosophy.

For undergraduates, the department offers a major with three specialization tracks: History of Philosophy; Social, Political, and Legal Philosophy; and Ethics and Values. For graduate students, we offer a Ph.D. that allows for specialization in all areas of the history of philosophy as well as many systematic areas. We also offer an M.A with specializations in the History of Philosophy and Social and Applied Philosophy.

Chair: James B. South

Contact:

W: http://www.marquette.edu/phil/index.shtml
E: MUPhilosophy@Marquette.edu
P: (414) 288-6857
F: (414) 288-3010
M: Coughlin Hall 132, PO Box 1881, Milwaukee WI, 53201-1881


Northwestern University
-Comparative Literary Studies, Ph.D.

Description:

The Comparative Literary Studies (CLS) Program is an interdepartmental, interdisciplinary program for the study of literature across national and linguistic lines. As its name indicates, its area of study encompasses literature, but unlike other literary disciplines the objects it investigates are not situated in any one national tradition or any one natural language. Rather, its boundary is defined by the plurality and diversity of differing cultural and linguistic traditions. In respect to such differences, the comparisons pursued in CLS do not primarily strive to establish parity between what is being compared, but rather explore problems that develop across different language-traditions and emerge out of their interaction.

Since such problems encompass the literatures of diverse cultures and traditions, they are determined first and foremost not simply by language, but by linguistic diversity. Moreover, the literary dimension of this diversity defines it as not just inter-linguistic but also and perhaps above all as intra-linguistic. Thus, for CLS, "natural" or "national" languages are never homogeneous or self-identical: beyond their divisions into dialects and idiolects of all sorts, they are divided intrinsically and constitutively by their signifying function, which at the same time also opens them to interaction with other signifying media.

Its tradition of close textual reading places comparative literary studies in a unique position to interact with developing studies of non-verbal media. What CLS has to contribute to media studies generally is its accumulated experience in the interpretation of signifying processes as they operate discursively. What it has to learn from non-literary media studies and other disciplines is how these processes operate in other discursive contexts and in non-discursive media.

Since the subject-matter of comparative literary studies is not defined in terms of linguistic, national or cultural homogeneity, the discipline of comparative literature demands constant reflection, reevaluation and redefinition; hence its constitutive attention to questions of theory and method, which however should never be isolated from the many and variegated practices of language and its interpretation.

As a result, CLS seeks to collaborate closely with other literature programs and with disciplines such as philosophy, political theory and media studies (such as music, film, theater, art history). This collaboration is in the first instance intra-university, but can, in certain cases, involve exchanges with other local universities, whose special competence is of particular relevance to CLS.

Program Director: Michal P. Ginsburg

Contact:

W: http://www.wcas.northwestern.edu/complit/
E: complit@northwestern.edu
P: (847) 491-3864
F: (847) 467-0683
M: Crowe Hall 1-117, 1860 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208

-Department of Philosophy, Ph.D. Program

Description:

The Northwestern Philosophy Department offers courses in a number of fields. At the higher levels, graduate course offerings reflect the department's research strengths: Ancient Philosophy, Epistemology, European Philosophy, Mind and Language and Moral and Political Philosophy.

Chair: Sanford Goldberg

Contact:

W: http://www.philosophy.northwestern.edu/
E: clafont@northwestern.edu (Cristina Lafont, Director of Graduate Studies)
P: 847-491-3656
F: 847-491-2547
M: Kresge 2-3351880, Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208

-Department of French, Ph.D. Program

Description:

The PhD Program in French focuses on literary and cultural production from throughout the French-speaking world and provides students with a strong theoretical background. Historically dedicated to training students in the various periods, genres, and media of cultural production in French, the program is also distinguished by its pioneering commitment to a broadly inclusive conception of the field of French and Francophone literatures and cultures, as well as its sustained engagement with developments in literary theory, philosophy, and critical thought that have indelibly impacted humanities scholarship of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The program aims to develop students’ metacritical perspectives through exposure to the range of theoretical and methodological approaches represented by our faculty. These include poststructuralist, postmodern, psychoanalytic, cultural historical, postcolonial, feminist, visual arts, gender studies, and historical materialist perspectives, as well as film and media theories.

Contact:

W: http://www.frenchanditalian.northwestern.edu/
E: french-italian@northwestern.edu
P: (847) 491-5490
F: (847) 491-3877
M: 1880 Campus Drive, Kresge 2-375 Evanston, IL 60208-2204


Penn State
-Department of Philosophy; PhD. Program

Description:

Graduate education in the Penn State Department of Philosophy is characterized by a focus on, and commitment to, the history of philosophy conceived as a basis for pursuing philosophy in an international context. Specifically, the program includes special emphases on both contemporary Continental philosophy (including phenomenology, existentialism, hermeneutics, social theory, and postmodernism) and classical American philosophy (including transcendentalism, naturalism, semiotics, pragmatism, and contemporary cultural issues). The curriculum is designed to foster and promote genuine dialogue across international borders and philosophical traditions, both established and emerging. The program is organized to facilitate the ability to engage meaningfully a variety of philosophical approaches—including feminist theory, analytic philosophy, critical race theory and social/political philosophy—and a range of systematic fields—including aesthetics, ethics, political philosophy, metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of science. Our faculty maintain strong professional relationships in Europe and Latin America. Members of the faculty work in close collaboration with students to ensure the depth and breadth of their philosophical education.

Interdisciplinary study is also possible across the humanities, the social sciences, the arts, the natural sciences, and interdisciplinary programs such as Women’s Studies, Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies, Bioethics and Medical Humanities, and Science, Technology, and Society. The Philosophy Department offers students the opportunity to earn a dual-title doctoral degree in Philosophy and Women’s Studies (http://womenstudies.psu.edu/graduate/degree_programs.shtml). There are doctoral minors available in social thought and in literary theory, criticism, and aesthetics. Study abroad is possible as well through exchange programs or individual arrangements with leading departments of philosophy in, for example, Freiburg, Lyons, and Sao Paulo.

Department Head: Shannon Sullivan

Contact:

W: http://philosophy.la.psu.edu/index.shtml
E: ntuana@psu.edu (Nancy Tuana, Graduate Officer)
P: 814-865-6397
F: 814-865-0119
M: 240 Sparks Building, University Park, PA 16802


Princeton University
-Department of Comparative Literature, Ph.D. Program

Description:

The degree of doctor of philosophy in comparative literature is offered by the department in cooperation with the other departments of literature. The program of study enables students with exceptional training in languages and literatures to profit from the increased awareness and understanding that may be derived from the considered view of more than one literature and of the theoretical presuppositions behind literary study as a whole. Lasting from four to five years, depending on the student's background, the program prepares candidates for scholarship in the field and for teaching in comparative literature, separate departments of literature, and the humanities. Entering students with a master's degree or its equivalent are normally expected to elect a four-year course of study; those without prior graduate training may enroll for five years.

Chair : Leonard Barkan
Director of Graduate Studies: April Alliston

Contact:

W: http://www.princeton.edu/complit/
E: complit@princeton.edu
P: (609) 258-4027
F: (609) 258-1873
M: 133 East Pyne, Princeton, NJ 08544


Purdue University
-Program in Comparative Literature, M.A. and Ph.D.

Description:

The purpose of the Comparative Literature Program is to foster cooperation between the Departments of English and Foreign Languages and Literatures. The program achieves this purpose by encouraging the study of literature, by promoting the study of a second or third foreign language, and by sponsoring courses and dissertations that cut across national boundaries. Comparative Literature recognizes that some fields - classics, medieval studies, Renaissance, post-colonial - are inherently comparative and seeks to facilitate the work of students and scholars in these fields. The program also recognizes the role of other disciplines-particularly history and philosophy, but also the social sciences and psychology in developing theoretical approaches to literature. While recognizing the value of cultural studies and linguistics, and encouraging investigations based in these disciplines, the program recognizes that other areas make these disciplines their priority. By contrast, Comparative Literature takes as its special mandate the teaching and comparing of world literature, not only as social documents but also as works of art whose full appreciation depends on the study of languages, an understanding of diversity and globalization, and an appreciation of various media.

Program Director: Charles Ross

W: http://www.sla.purdue.edu/academic/idis/complit/
E: dkgraham@purdue.edu (Delayne Graham, Administrative Assistant)
P: (765) 496-9629
F: (765) 494-3660
M: Beering Hall Room 1289, 100 North University Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907

information provided by: Beate I. Allert

-Ph.D. Program in Philosophy and Literature

Description:

The Philosophy and Literature Program offers an interdisciplinary course of study on the graduate level leading to the Ph.D. degree. The program encourages the interplay between philosophy and literature in such areas as social and critical theory, feminism, hermeneutics, narrative, semiotics, psychoanalysis, aesthetics, African-American studies, and cultural studies. In consultation with faculty, each student designs a plan of study to accommodate his or her specific goals and interests. The program seeks to foster critical and independent thought while providing cohesive professional training.

Program Director: Leonard Harris

Contact:

W: http://www.sla.purdue.edu/academic/idis/phil-lit/
E: mckinney@purdue.edu (Chris McKinney)
P: (765) 494-4276
F: (765) 496-1616
M: Beering Hall of Liberal Arts and Education, 100 North University Street, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-2098

-Program in Philosophy, M.A. and PhD.

Description:

The Department of Philosophy at Purdue University is distinguished both by its strength in traditional areas of philosophical inquiry, including especially the history of philosophy, and by its notable contributions to contemporary philosophy. There are faculty working in the history of philosophy from antiquity to the present, and in most areas of contemporary Anglo-American and Continental European philosophy. A dozen areas of particular strength in which several faculty members work are listed on our faculty research interests page. The wide range of faculty interests and an excellent student-faculty ratio enable students to pursue research interests in many areas. The Department offers courses of study leading to B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees.

Contact:

W: http://www.cla.purdue.edu/philosophy/
E: PurduePhilosophy@purdue.edu
P: (765) 494-4276
F: (765) 496-1616
M: 100 N. University Street, West Lafayette, IN, 47907-2098.


Rutgers University
-Department of French, M.A.T., M.A., Ph.D. Programs

Description:

With 15 distinguished faculty members and a unique array of resources and opportunities, our undergraduate and graduate programs are among the strongest, largest and most varied in the country, striving to present and study the languages, cultures, and literatures of France and the Francophone world in all their past and present diversity.

Department Chair: James Swenson

Contact:

W: http://french.rutgers.edu/
E: french1@rci.rutgers.edu
P: 732.932.8223
F: 732.932.8327
M: 131 George Street, New Brunswick, NJ 08901


San Francisco State University
-Humanities Department, M.A.

Chair: Saul Steier

Contact:

W: http://www.sfsu.edu/~bulletin/current/programs/humanit.htm#1601
P: 415-338-1830
M: HUM 410, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94132


Stanford University
- Department of Comparative Literature, Ph.D.

Description:

The Department of Comparative Literature differs from most national literature departments. While it seeks to prepare its students for reading and research in the languages and histories of different societies and periods, it is also dedicated to their critical and cultural analysis. Literary theory in all its forms helps to break down the borders between national literary fields, as well as between literary studies and other disciplines. Indeed, the discipline of Comparative Literature asks, often, just what "literature" is, and how it functions as a product of (and response to) our imaginations, our languages, and our social and economic lives. Students in our courses, majors in the department, and graduate students in the Ph.D. program all interact to shape debates about the place of the verbal arts (and the methods of their study) in past times and our own.

Department Chair: Russell Berman

W: http://philit.stanford.edu/
E: comparativelit@stanford.edu
P: (650) 723-3566
F: (650) 725-4090
M: 450 Serra Mall, Bldg 260,(Pigott Hall, Room 209), Stanford, CA 94305-2031

-Department of Philosophy and Literature, workshop for Stanford Ph.D. students

Description:

What is so fascinating about works like Plato's dialogues and Dostoevsky's novels? Can philosophy and literature, in such combinations, achieve more than the sum of the two parts? Can philosophical approaches account for the specific power of literary works, even those that are not overtly philosophical? And can literary devices contribute to philosophical goals—in a way, perhaps, that nothing else could?

Founded in 2004, the initiative in Philosophy and Literature brings together Stanford’s vibrant group of literary scholars and its renowned philosophy department to answer questions like these. The initiative currently comprises a set of undergraduate major tracks, a graduate student workshop, and faculty-led events.

Contact:

W: http://philit.stanford.edu/
E: landy@stanford.edu (Joshua Landy)
P: (650) 723-4914


State University of New York at Binghamton
-Department of Philosophy (Program in Philosophy, Interpretation and Culture, M.A. and Ph.D.)

Description:

Our department is philosophically diverse. Our faculty's research reflects the richness of the contemporary philosophical scene with faculty specializing in the history of philosophy, analytic, continental, feminist, non-western, postcolonial and critical race philosophy. We emphasize excellence in teaching and many of the faculty have won distinguished teaching awards.

The Philosophy Department at Binghamton University offers a specialized graduate program in Social, Political, Ethical and Legal Philosophy (SPEL) leading to an MA or a PhD, as well as a philosophy undergraduate major, and a five-year combined degree that brings together the philosophy major and the SPEL MA. The department sponsors the undergraduate program in Philosophy, Politics and Law (PPL) and the five-year combined degree in PPL and SPEL. The Philosophy Department also cooperates with the Comparative Literature Department, which offers a unique PhD specialization in Philosophy, Literature and Theory of Criticism.

Chair: Max Pensky

Contact:

W: http://www2.binghamton.edu/philosophy/
E: yaworski@binghamton.edu (Melanie Yaworski, Administrative Assistant)
P: 607.777.3616 or 607.777.2735
F: 607.777.2734
M: PO Box 6000, Binghamton, NY 13902-6000

-Department of Comparative Literature (Program in Philosophy, Literature, and Theory of Criticism)

Description:

The Department of Comparative Literature at Binghamton University offers a distinctive undergraduate major and three avenues of graduate study with M.A. and Ph.D. options. It features, in addition to its primary M.A. and Ph.D. programs in Comparative Literature, an M.A. in Translation Studies, a unique interdisciplinary doctoral program in Philosophy, Literature, and the Theory of Criticism, as well as a Ph.D. in Translation Studies through the internationally recognized Translation Research and Instruction Program. With a long-standing commitment to theory and a progressive understanding of the discipline, it has also embarked on a new effort to define the specific contributions of the humanities to the pressing socio-political and ethical concerns of the contemporary world. It actively embraces new directions for trans-disciplinary research and attempts to determine how such research can help to draw forth and carry forward the fundamental questions that concern the humanities. A strong engagement with the question of literary language and with contemporary work in the arts anchors this effort to rethink the place of the humanities and literary study while respecting the special temporalities and forms of encounter that characterize these domains.

Chair: Gisela Brinker-Gabler

Contact:

W: http://www2.binghamton.edu/comparative-literature/
E: kstanley@binghamton.edu (Kathleen Stanley, Department Secretary)
P: 607-777-2891
F: 607-777-2892
M: P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, NY 13902


State University of New York at Buffalo
-Department of Comparative Literature; M.A. Ph.D.

Description:

The Department of Comparative Literature at the University at Buffalo is a relatively small, yet independent program. It combines a tradition of scholarly rigor with openness to fresh currents in literary studies. While rooted in an intense ongoing inquiry into the nature of literature, its conceptual and philosophical underpinnings, and its critical methods, the department sustains a wide range of interdisciplinary approaches and projects. In the past, students have incorporated into their work concerns and methods deriving from philosophy, psychoanalysis, legal studies, political theory, and anthropology.

In adapting to changes in the current academic climate, the department has also been successfully fostering new interests in nationalism and colonialism, cultural studies, visual arts (film theory, art history and architecture), and gender studies. Members of the department, who draw on a wide variety of fields of interest, offer both historical and systematic exposure to ideas that are developing throughout the humanities. This is richly complemented by a full program of distinguished visiting lecturers.

Because of its small size, the department offers students a very close working relationship with faculty. There are approximately as many faculty members as degree-seeking students. In all cases, students take considerable personal initiative in shaping their program of study. As a general guideline, however, and in order to provide intellectual orientation to incoming students, the department offers two flexible options of study: Comparative Studies and Critical Theory.

Chair: David E. Johnson

W: http://cas.buffalo.edu/complit/index.shtml
E: complit@buffalo.edu
P: 716.645.2066
F: 716.645.5979
M: 638 Clemens Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260-4610

-Department of English, Poetics Program (M.A. and Ph.D.)

Description:

Founded in 1991 by Robert Creeley, Susan Howe, Dennis Tedlock, Charles Bernstein, and Raymond Federman, the Poetics Program takes as its principle that its literary artists should teach not only the art of writing but also the theory of writing practice, in both undergraduate courses and graduate seminars. As the founding document states, the Poetics Program gives formal presence to "an extraordinary concentration of interest in poetics that makes UB unique among literature departments in North America," and that "encompass[es] subjects well beyond contemporary English-language poetry—including ethnopoetics, the poetics of fiction and ‘prose,’ the poetics of translation, and more generally the poetics of various literatures of the Western traditions." By recruiting writers with the ability to theorize their art, the Poetics Program distinguishes itself from MFA "creative writing" programs across the country. As part of the English Department, Poetics engages critics and scholars from Comparative Literature, Romance Languages, Art History, American Studies, Philosophy, Classics, and Media Studies. Its universe is an amalgam of practice, theory, and textual study, with influences from the literary avant garde, links to the graphic arts, openness to critical theory, connections to the linguistic flux and polyphony of modern diasporas, and a keen appreciation of the cybernetic worlds of hypertext and streaming video. It has a fundamental and close working relationship with the renowned Poetry Collection of the University library and with the vast web matrix of the Electronic Poetry Center (EPC).

Poetics at Buffalo is committed to all methods of analysis that open up poetry and other forms of writing for inspection. It regards "poetics" as the sum of the theoretical languages that define and inform the term poiesis as construction and making. It recognizes the literary text in all its aspects, from its material existence—right down to the ink and paper—to the labor that creates it, its personal significance to the poet, and its historical value to the culture that consumes it. It attends to its relation to the human body, to speech and physiology, to the poem as utterance and performance. It acknowledges historical forces and philosophical movements, poetry past along with poetry present. It is mindful of neuro-linguistics, of speech acts, of the poetics specific to other cultures - to ethnopoetics. Ethnopoetics entails attention to the ethnic specificity and regional locality of all poetic practices. Oral poetry is not something older than or prior to or simpler than the written text, but coexists and interacts with it. It considers both alphabetic and non-alphabetic writing codes of the historical past and imaginary codes of a potential present.

The implications of this multiple perspective are programmatic as well as theoretical. While the approach to "creative writing" at other universities often ignores the significance of critical reflection, sometimes pitting creativity against conceptual thinking, the Poetics Program insists that scholarship, historical research, and critical writing are at the core of graduate education. The many visitors who come to UB to read as part of the "Poetics Plus" program are integrated into the seminar work of graduate students. As a result, Poetics has become a major national and international center for the study of modernist and experimental poetry and attracts an outstanding range of students interested in both scholarship and creative activity. The Program recruits students from all over the U.S. and recruits international scholars as well. The UB Poetics Program is one of the world’s most prominent programs relating to the study of poiesis in its many aspects.

Chair: Steve McCaffery

Contact:

W: http://english.buffalo.edu/fields_of_study/poetics/
E: mmkim@buffalo.edu (Myung Mi Kim, Director of Poetics)
P: 716-645-2575
F: 716-645-5980
M: 306 Clemens Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260


Stony Brook University (SUNY)
-Department of Philosophy, M.A. (Philosophy and the Arts), Ph.D. in Philosophy

Description:

The Department of Philosophy at Stony Brook University grants B.A., M.A. and Ph.D. degrees to a broad range of students with diverse and varied interests. Committed to a pluralist treatment of philosophical issues, the department encourages interdisciplinary study as well as more traditional approaches to philosophy. Convinced that a knowledge of the history of philosophy is essential to understanding contemporary philosophy, the department offers intensive courses in ancient, medieval, and modern thought. Other courses address specific philosophical problems in ethics, political theory, epistemology, aesthetics, environmental philosophy, feminism, critical race theory, and philosophy of technology.

The department at Stony Brook is internationally renowned for its concentration in Continental philosophy, with particular emphasis on contemporary French and German thought. Courses in phenomenology, psychoanalysis, structuralism, postructuralism and postmodernism, and critical theory are held regularly, focussing on such figures as Husserl, Merleau-Ponty, Derrida, Kristeva, Freud, Lacan, Irigaray, Levinas, and Habermas. Crucial nineteenth century philosophers such as Hegel and Nietzsche are also treated in depth. As well, the department offers many International Research Opportunities to graduate students who wish to pursue the study of Continental philosophy in Europe.

Stony Brook maintains a lively dialogue with Anglo-American philosophy, which is also strongly represented among faculty. A comparative seminar in a topic of common concern to continental and analytic philosophy is given each year. Other analytic courses cover computational theory, questions of meaning and metaphor, issues in philosophical psychology, and special problems in philosophical logic.

Stony Brook's Philosophy Department has just joined the New York Consortium of Graduate Schools, which will permit graduate students to take courses for credit at schools in the New York City area, including Rutgers, Princeton, New York University, and Columbia.

Chair: Robert Crease

PhD. Program Director: Anne O'Byrne

M.A. Program Director: Eduardo Mendieta

W: http://www.sunysb.edu/philosophy/
E: Kathleen-Anna Amella (Graduate Studies Coordinator)
P: (631) 632-7580
F: 631-632-7522
M: Harriman Hall 215, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794

 

-Advanced Graduate Certificate in Art and Philosophy (supplements enrollment in Ph.D., M.F.A., and M.A. Programs at Stony Brook University)

Description:

The Stony Brook Graduate Certificate Program in Art and Philosophy (ArtPHIL) is designed to provide an interdisciplinary course of instruction for students already enrolled (full-time) in a graduate degree-granting program (such as Art History and Criticism, or Philosophy, or a related discipline such as Comparative Literature, Music, English, etc...).

Program Director: Hugh J. Silverman

Contact:
E: hugh.silverman@stonybrook.edu

W: http://stonybrook.edu/artphil

-Department of Cultural Analysis and Theory, M.A., Ph.D. (Comparative Literature), Ph.D. (Cultural Studies)

Description:

Students and faculty in the Department of Cultural Analysis and Theory (CAT) at Stony Brook University engage in exciting, interdisciplinary approaches to traditional fields of study. Our goal is to investigate new cultural, pop-cultural, and cross-cultural phenomena from multiple points of view.

The Department offers two graduate programs: one in Comparative Literature (M.A. and Ph.D. degrees) and one in Cultural Studies (M.A. and Ph.D. degrees). The programs are distinct, with different requirements, but students in one program may include the other as one of their fields of study. Graduate students have the opportunity to assist and teach in all of three undergraduate programs. Ph.D.s in recent years have landed tenure-track jobs at such institutions as Baruch College, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Skidmore College, California State University, DePaul University.

Chair: Robert Harvey

W: http://www.stonybrook.edu/complit/new/index.html
E: mmoranluba@notes.cc.sunysb.edu (Mary Moran-Luba, Departmental Administrator)
P: (631) 632-7456
F: (631) 632-5707
M: 2049 Humanities Building, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5355

-Department of Art, M.A., Ph.D. (Art History and Criticism); MFA (Studio Art)

Description:

The Art Department of Stony Brook University offers innovative and dynamic programs in Studio Art and Art History and Criticism. It believes that art must be taught with a critical consciousness of the broad intellectual and social issues of our time. Both graduate and undergraduate curricula benefit from interrelations between the programs.

At the undergraduate level, it offers the B.A. degree in Studio Art, the B.A. in Art History, minors in both areas and the Digital Arts Minor. At the graduate level, it offers a three-year M.F.A. in Studio Art and M.A. and PhD degrees in Art History and Criticism.

Studies are facilitated by Stony Brook's ideal location half-way between the art centers of New York City and East Hampton, along the beautifully wooded North Shore of Long Island. Classes, lectures, and conferences are now also offered at the newly opened Stony Brook Manhattan facility. All curricula are designed to take advantage of the full range of museums, galleries and libraries of the New York City-Long Island region as well as the facilities of a major research university campus.

Chair: John Lutterbie

Program Director: Studio Art (Stephanie Dinkins)

Program Director: Art History and Criticism (Michele Bogart)

W: http://www.art.sunysb.edu/
E: lisa.perez@stonybrook.edu (Graduate Coordinator)
P: (631) 632-7250
F: (631) 632-7261
M: 2224 Staller Center for the Arts, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794-5400


Universite de Montreal
-Department de litterature comparee, Ph.D. en littérature (program option: Theorie et epistemologie de la literature)

Description:

Offering theoretical and interdisciplinary approaches to literature, other forms of discourse, and cultural practices in general. Seminars taught in French, although thesis may be written in other languages.

Program Director: François Lepage

Contact Information:

W: http://www.littco.umontreal.ca/index.htm
E: info-littco@umontreal.ca
P: (514) 343-7255
F: (514) 343-2211
M: Université de Montréal, C. P. 6128, succursale Centre-ville, Montreal, Canada H3C 3J7

Information submitted by: Amaryll Chanady


University of California, Berkeley
-Department of Rhetoric; Ph.D.

Description:

The Department of Rhetoric encourages applications from students who want to pursue interdisciplinary research in the humanities and the social sciences. Our diverse faculty work on a wide range of topics and with various theoretical approaches, yet we have particular strengths in the following concentrated areas of study: Classical Rhetoric and Ancient Culture,.Continental Philosophy and Critical Theory, Film and Media Studies, Gender and Sexuality, History and Theory, Law,.Literary and Cultural Studies, Political and Social Thought, Race and Ethnicity. We are particularly interested in people who want to work critically within (and between) constituted disciplines. Please note that the Rhetoric Department admits students for a PhD only. Although an MA degree is awarded after partial completion of the requirements for the PhD, there is no MA program as such with its own curriculum.

Contact:

W: http://rhetoric.berkeley.edu/graduate.html
E: trout@berkeley.edu (Maxine Fredericksen, Graduate Assistant)
P: 510-642-3522
F: 510-642-8881
M: 7406 Dwinelle Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-2670


University of California at Irvine -Department of Comparative Literature

The Ph.D. Comparative Literature at UC Irvine features internationally renowned permanent and visiting faculty and rich offerings in critical theory, postcolonial studies, and modern culture.

The Department is committed to its historic strength in theory, and is like no other department nationally in the number and richness of theory courses we offer. Many seminars in psychoanalysis, political theory, queer theory, and narrative theory, for example, are taught each year. Our postcolonial faculty includes eminent senior scholars such as Ackbar Abbas (whose research has focused on Hong Kong and globalization) and Ngugi wa Thiong’o (Africa and the Caribbean, minority discourse, and translation); Gayatri Spivak teaches annually in the Spring quarter. At the same time, we pursue comparative European studies, literary, film, and media studies, and the history of ideas. We encourage interdisciplinary work, and place no restrictions on the kinds of courses that students can take as part of their coursework. Area studies are fostered by collaborative Ph.D. programs with other departments such as Spanish and Portuguese and French and Italian: students emerge from such programs with, for example a Ph.D. in Spanish and Comparative Literature. Emphases within the Comparative Literature Ph.D. are available in several areas, including critical theory and feminist studies. Across the program, we integrate theory with inquiry into historical and contemporary sociopolitical problems.

Chair: M. Ackbar Abbas

W: www.humanities.uci.edu/complit
E: complit@uci.edu
P: (949) 824-6406
F: (949) 824-6416
M: 243 Humanities Instructional Building, University of California Irvine, CA 92697-2651

-Department of Drama / Interdisciplinary Studies, M.A., M.F.A., Ph.D.

Description:

Drama at UCI is one of the four departments comprising the Claire Trevor School of the Arts, which provides students with extensive opportunities to work in collaboration with students and faculty in the School’s closely-related programs - Dance, Music and Studio Art. Within the school, therefore, cross-disciplinary creative opportunities - such as video art, multi-media performance, opera, dance theatre and performance art - continually flourish. Nor are interdisciplinary connections limited to within our School – Drama enjoys fruitful relations with a great many departments and programs across the campus, including English, History, Comparative Literature, Political Science, Computer Science, Asian American Studies, African American Studies, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Critical Theory, Spanish and Portuguese, German and Russian, and French and Italian. And Drama’s PhD studies are conducted as part of a comprehensive joint program – the first such in the nation - with our sister campus, UC San Diego.

Contact:

W: http://drama.arts.uci.edu/about.html
E: drama@uci.edu
P: 949-824-6614
F: 949-824-3475
M: Department of Drama, Irvine, CA 92697-2775


University of California, Santa Cruz
-History of Consciousness Program; Ph.D.

Description:

History of Consciousness is an interdisciplinary graduate program centered in the humanities with links to the social sciences, natural sciences, and the arts. It is concerned with forms of human expression and social action as they are manifested in specific historical, cultural, and political contexts.

Contact:

W: http://histcon.ucsc.edu/


University of Illinois , Urbana-Champaign
-Department of English, Unit for Criticism and Interpretive Theory; Graduate Certificate.

Description:

The Unit for Criticism and Interpretive Theory is an interdisciplinary program developed within the Graduate College and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Since 1981, the Unit has been at the forefront of scholarly discussion and debate about topics such as poststructuralism, cultural studies, Marxism, feminism, postcolonial theory, and the politics of disciplinarity and knowledge production. Books derived from Unit conferences, such as Marxism and the Interpretation of Culture and Cultural Studies, have become landmarks of critical discourse in the academy.

Drawing upon the expertise and resources of twenty four humanities and social sciences departments, the Unit for Criticism and Interpretive Theory promotes a broad range of teaching, research, and related scholarly activities. Through a variety of programs—including regular theory seminars for faculty and graduate students, lectures and roundtables; visits to campus by distinguished scholars from other universities; agenda-setting conferences; designated courses; writing groups; and our weblog Kritik—the Unit provides students and faculty with interdisciplinary vantage points for their teaching and research. Open to scholars with diverse area, period, and methodological interests, the Unit seeks to enhance awareness of the theoretical premises underlying critical practices across the humanities and social sciences, and to provide fora in which competing theoretical claims can be articulated and discussed. Each semester, the Unit sponsors a series of activities that focuses in depth on a particular theme. Recent themes have included Modernities, New Approaches to African-American Literature and Culture, the Cultural Politics of Neoliberalism, New Materialisms, and Feminist Futures. The Unit is designed to serve beginning graduate students who want a broad grounding in interpretive theory as well as advanced students with well-defined research interests. Unit-affiliated students are eligible to apply for conference travel support, fellowships to the School of Criticism and Theory at Cornell University, and to participate in all Unit activities, including a yearly series of lectures on Modern Critical Theory. To graduate students enrolled in M.A. or Ph.D. programs in participating departments, the Unit also offers a formal program leading to advanced certification in criticism and interpretive theory. Students who would like to pursue certification should consult the requirements listed on the Unit website and should set up an appointment to talk with the Unit director.

Director: Laura Goodlad

Contact:

W: http://criticism.english.illinois.edu/
E: unitcrit@illinois.edu
P: (217) 333-2581
M: 608 South Wright St., MC-718, Urbana, Illinois 61801


University of Minnesota Twin Cities Campus
-Department of Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature, Program in Comparative Studies in Discourse and Society; Ph.D.

Description:

Deciding to study and teach critical theory and practice in the current political / cultural moment is a brave act. Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature honors that commitment. The good news is that you will be able to define an original program of study reflecting your interests and expertise. We'll support you with solid courses in the historical, philosophical, theoretical strains of thought that anchor contemporary scholarship in the humanities and social sciences. We'll help you connect to scholars across the university—certainly to those in related humanities and social-science disciplines, but also availing yourself of the resources of a comprehensive research university with programs in all core sciences, engineering and technology, agriculture, medicine, law and the professions. Our students create projects of striking originality and scope.

The bad news, of course, is the same: you've got to define the critical, cross (and anti-) disciplinary and methodological space in which you work. It's often an unmarked trail. But we offer a community of singular coherence and supportiveness. It's a good place to work.

Anchoring our programs is a commitment to praxis and professionalism. We take Freire's notion of the 'transformative intellectual' seriously. Pedagogy is integral to our work, not just a job. Our students teach all levels of comparative study, designing their own courses with solid support from a seminar in pedagogy for Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature and a program of teaching mentorship. You'll leave your doctoral work with a teaching portfolio the rivals that of a mid-level assistant professor, and the language to explain it.

Similarly, we take the structure, history and political function of academe and academic departments as a worthy topic of inquiry. Our graduate students participate in the governance of the Department, and learn how universities operate. We offer workshops in all the material aspects of academic life: writing for publication, getting grants, preparing yourself for the job market—and actually getting that job.

In short: if you're going to dedicate a large part of a decade to graduate study, you need to do it in a place where you will flourish. We are committed to justifying your faith.

Do consider joining this vibrant program engaged in re-imagining comparative studies.

Chair: John Archer

Contact:

W: http://cscl.cla.umn.edu/grad/csds/index.htm
E: cscl@umn.edu
P: 612-624-8099
F: 612-625-4170
M: 235 Nicholson Hall, 216 Pillsbury Dr SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455


University of New Mexico
-Department of Philosophy, M.A. and Ph.D. Programs

Description:

The Department of Philosophy at the University of New Mexico has strengths in the following areas: History of Modern Philosophy, Epistemology, Metaphysics, Ethics, Philosophy of Mind, Philosophy of Art and Literature, Philosophy of Religion, History of Analytic Philosophy, Asian Philosophy. Students can expect a high degree of personal attention and interaction with the faculty.

Chair: John Bussanich

Contact:

W: http://www.unm.edu/~thinker
E: ithomson@unm.edu (Iain Thomson, Graduate Director)
P: (505) 277-2405
F: (505) 277-6362
M: MSC 03 2140, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001

Information provided by: A. F. Schueler


University of Pennsylvania
-Program in Comparative Literature and Literary Theory, Ph.D. Program

Description:

The Program in Comparative Literature & Literary Theory at Penn is a dynamic and congenial intellectual community that brings members together through common, core interests. We offer undergraduate and graduate programs for the study of literature through various disciplinary and critical perspectives, and the study of cultural history through the production of representations. The Program enables students to engage rigorously with critical theory as both a reflection on interpretive method and a tool of critique.

Graduate Chair: Kevin Platt

Contact:

W: http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/Complit/
E: jdubil@sas.upenn.edu (JoAnne Dubil, Program Coordinator)
P: 215-898-6836
F: 215-573-9451
M: 720 Williams Hall, Philadelphia, PA 19104


University of Southern California
-School of Cinema-Television, Program in Critical Studies; M.A. Ph.D.

Description:

In 1959, USC became the nation's first university to offer a Ph.D. in Critical Studies, and as such the School of Cinematic Arts has a long history of preparing some of the leading scholars in the discipline. The writings of SCA scholars appear in all the major publications in the field, and their books have become instrumental in educating and inspiring ensuing generations of cinematic artists and theorists.

The range of interests and expertise reflected in the department is broad and diverse, stretching from the study of American cinema to international topics to issues of race and gender to understanding the impact of technology on society, and much more. The school encourages even greater intellectual expansion by enabling applicants to tailor their program to their individual needs and interests. The overall course of study for the Doctor of Philosophy will be designed by the student, the student's designated advisor and, following the screening procedure, the student's guidance committee chair

Chair (Critical Studies Division): Akira Mizuta Lippit

Contact:

W: http://cinema.usc.edu/prospective/phd-programs/critical-studies-phd/
E: admissions@cinema.usc.edu
P: (213) 740-8358
F: (213) 740-7682
M: University Park, SCA 465, Los Angeles, CA 90089-2211


University of Southern Illinois Carbondale
-Department of Philosophy PhD

Description:

The Philosophy Department at Southern Illinois University Carbondale offers a wide range of advanced courses in the major areas within the field leading to the M.A. and/or Ph.D. degrees. Students are offered a diversified curriculum not dominated by one school of thought or method of approach. The broad range of specializations represented by the faculty expose students to a variety of aspects of philosophy and at the same time permits them to concentrate on their own particular area(s) of interest.

Contact:

W: http://philosophy.siuc.edu/
E: phildept@siu.edu
P: 618.536.6641
F: 618.453.7428
M: 980 Faner Drive, Room 3065, Mailcode 4505, Carbondale, Illinois 62901


University of Virginia
-Department of Germanic Languages and Literature, M.A. and Ph.D.

Description:

The graduate program, consistently rated one of the top ten in the country, has a flexible curriculum based on advanced work in such areas as literary history, genre study, hermeneutics, bibliography and intellectual history.

Chair: Volker Kaiser

Contact:

W: http://www.virginia.edu/german/Graduate/Degrees_Reqs.html
E: germandepartment@virginia.edu
P: 434-924-3530
F: 434-924-6700
M: 521 New Cabell Hall, P.O. Box 400125, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4125


University of Washington
-Department of Anthropology, Program in Sociocultural Anthropology (M.A. and PhD. Program)

Description:

The study of sociocultural anthropology at the University of Washington encompasses a diverse array of approaches to the study of culture and ethnographic research, from theories of culture and power to post-structuralism, post-colonialism, post-socialism, critical theory, and semiotics. Topical interests among the faculty include ethnicity; identity and representation; politics of reproduction; gender; language ideology; environment and development; governmentality and institutions; ethnobiology; religion; cross-cultural studies of healing and death; popular culture; nationalism, globalization, and migration studies; the history and critique of anthropology; tourism; political economy; indigenous rights, law, and human rights; and violence and warfare. Program strengths lie in the areas of medical anthropology and the politics of reproduction; governmentality studies; nationalism, ethnicity, and identity; science and technology studies; and culture and environment.

Chair: Bettina Shell-Duncan

Contact:

W: http://depts.washington.edu/anthweb/programs/sociocultural.php
E: mcaputi@u.washington.edu (Michael Caputi, Program Administrator)
P: (206) 543-5240
F: (206) 543-3285
M: Box 353100, Seattle, WA 98195-3100


University of Western Ontario
-Department of English, English Language and Literature

Description:

The Department of English at the University of Western Ontario has a long and rich history of exceptional research and teaching, and our students, both graduate and undergraduate, have distinguished themselves both during their studies and beyond them in their chosen careers. We offer courses and conduct research in all the major periods and genres of English literature and in a wide range of interdisciplinary fields, including theory, medieval studies, cultural studies, Indigenous studies, postcolonial literature and theory, queer studies, feminist and gender studies, ecological criticism, and digital humanities.

Chair: Jan Plug

Contact Information:

W: www.uwo.ca/english
E: vlavers@uwo.ca (Vivian Foglton, Department Secretary)
P: (519) 519 661-3403
F: (519) 661-3776
M: University College, Room 173, London, ON Canada N6A 3K7

-Program in Theory and Criticism, M.A and PhD.

Description:

The Centre for the Study of Theory and Criticism is an established cross-disciplinary forum for research and advanced study in theory, and its problems and practices. Research at the Centre focuses on the work of such movements as poststructuralism, semiotics, hermeneutics, phenomenology, the Frankfurt School, psychoanalysis, Marxism and feminism, as well as on areas such as continental philosophy that are part of the history of contemporary theory. More broadly, it is concerned with the questions raised by these movements, and with constructing a dialogue both between theory and its history and between the disciplines or discourses that have contributed to contemporary theory.

Director - Dr. Verónica Schild

Program Coordinator- Ms. Melanie Caldwell Clark

W: http://www.uwo.ca/theory/index.html
E: theory@uwo.ca
P: (519) 661-3442
F: (519) 850-2927
M: The University of Western Ontario, Somerville House Rm. 2345, London, Ontario, Canada, N6A 3K7


Vanderbilt University
-Department of English; PhD

Description:

The Ph.D. Program in English offers coursework and research supervision in all areas of British, American, and Anglophone literature, film, cultural studies, and literary theory. We aim to produce first-quality scholars, critics, and teachers of literature and culture for colleges and universities. Our program is small, focused, and dynamic

Contact:

W: http://sitemason.vanderbilt.edu/english/
P: (615) 322-2541
F: (615) 343-8028
M: 331 Benson Hall, 2301 Vanderbilt Place, PMB 351654, Nashville, Tennessee, 37235-1654

-Department of Philosophy; PhD.

Description:

The Philosophy Department offers a B.A. and Ph. D. degree. Faculty research ranges over a broad spectrum, covering all major topical areas and historical periods. Sites of particular strength include American Philosophy, Continental Philosophy, History of Philosophy, and Social and Political Philosophy. A diversity of interests and approaches is reflected in the department’s course offerings. In addition, the department hosts a weekly colloquium series which features presentations from distinguished philosophers from around the country

Contact:

W: http://www.vanderbilt.edu/AnS/philosophy/index.php
E: philosophy@vanderbilt.edu
P: (615) 322-2637
F: (615) 343-7259
M: 111 Furman Hall, Nashville, TN 37240


York University (Toronto, CANADA)
-Graduate Programme in Social and Political Thought, M.A. and Ph.D

Description:

Founded in 1973, York University's unique interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Social and Political Thought (SPTH) undertakes to encourage, develop and advance the analysis of social and political ideas with the aim of integrating intellectual interests common to the humanities and social sciences. It leads to the M.A and Ph.D degrees. The Program is not associated with any particular school of thought, and stresses both historical and systematic study of social and political ideas. In cooperation with the participating academic disciplines from across the university, the program’s curriculum is structured around three flexible areas of study: History of Social and Political Thought, Society and Economy, and Consciousness and Society.

The Graduate Program in Social & Political Thought is fundamentally a doctoral program, with a small master's program. Students are encouraged to become creative scholars and teachers and to work independently. For this reason, only those students who indicate that they wish to complete such a program of independent study will normally be admitted. In selecting their courses, students will be expected to acquire a broad, balanced knowledge of the field as a whole, as well as pursue their own specialized interests. In all cases students will have to take considerable personal initiative to develop an intellectually coherent pattern of study which will lead to the writing of an original doctoral dissertation in Social and Political Thought. Students will be required to be adequately prepared in those languages essential to their dissertation research.

Contact:

W: http://www.yorku.ca/gradspth/
E: spthinfo@yorku.ca
P: (416) 736-5320
F: (416) 650-8075
M: S711 Ross Building

 

 

 

 

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Monday, December 18, 2017, 3:10 GMT (Greenwich Mean Time)